Top Ten Fantasy/Scifi Series For Teens (In No Particular Order)...

Oct 13, 2011 by

1.  The Abhorsen Trilogy, by Garth Nix The Abhorsen trilogy is by far one of the most original young adult fantasies I’ve ever read. It was published in the mid-to-late 90’s, written by Australian author Garth Nix. The trilogy, beginning with Sabriel, creates an immersive world that is split into the New Kingdom and the Old Kingdom, swirling with magic, and steeped in its own carefully constructed mythology and legends. The story follows Sabriel, a young girl who is the daughter of Abhorsen (a powerful figure who fights necromancers with necromancy), as she and her family battle against the Dead’s endless struggle to rejoin the living. Easy to read for any young adult or independent reader, it addresses the dangers of abusing power and the issues surrounding death, among other things. I recommend it...

read more

The Best Twitter Resources for Writers...

Oct 12, 2011 by

For those of us in writing and publishing, we are lucky–the literary community on Twitter (not to mention the web at large) is huge. If you know which hashtags to use, you can connect with this massive community on a daily basis.   “Slow” chat hashtags These hashtags are traditionally used to join the overall conversation on Twitter. There’s no set time for posting messages with these hashtags–they’re meant to create ongoing discussions. #amwriting #writegoal #wip #writetip #nanowrimo #editing #askagent This is by no means a complete list, but they are the hashtags I found to be most immediately useful when I was getting started on Twitter. Find more slow chat hashtags here and here.   Organized discussions InkyGirl has a killer list of twitter chats that typically happen on a weekly basis. A...

read more

Inspiration: Joyce Carol Vincent...

Oct 11, 2011 by

What a fascinating person and story. On 25 January 2006, officials from a north London housing association repossessing a bedsit in Wood Green owing to rent arrears made a grim discovery. Lying on the sofa was the skeleton of a 38-year-old woman who had been dead for almost three years….In a city such as London, home to 8 million people, how could someone’s absence go unnoticed for so long? Who was Joyce Vincent? What was she like? How could she have been forgotten?   Some reports suggested Joyce was, or had been, engaged to be married, and that before living in the bedsit she had been in a refuge for victims of domestic violence. But she didn’t fit the typical profile of someone who might die and be forgotten: she wasn’t old without family;...

read more